New Poll: Public Supports Health Insurance Payroll Assessment 66 to 29%!

Respected pollster Gerry Cherinsky just released a new poll with lots of surprising and significant results, for example:

–Massachusetts voters support in-state tuition rates for children of illegal immigrants 54-42%;
–Gov. Romney’s favorability is now at 47%; 42% consider his job performance excellent or above average and 53% label it below average or poor;
–Lt. Gov. Kerry Healey’s favorability is at 32%, 33% unfavorable, 37% no opinion;
–AG Tom Reilly beats Healey 57 to 25%, and Deval Patrick scores an easy win also;
–The public is dead split on slot machines at race tracks: 49% yes, and 45% no.

OK, but what about requiring employers to who don’t offer health insurance to pay a payroll assessment?

From State House News Service: “The notion of raising taxes on businesses who can afford to provide health coverage, but don’t, earned overwhelming support: 66 to 29 percent. But Chervinsky cautioned: “Citizens almost always embrace business taxes without realizing the direct impact that has on them personally. One of the problems with sampling public opinion is that people are inclined to say, ‘Sure go ahead, tax ’em,’ without taking into account all the implications. The citizenry is a little unrealistic.'”

C’mon Gerry, how about just a little respect? Last April, Tom Kiley did a poll for the Mass. Hospital Association showing that 65% of the public supports payroll taxes on employers who don’t provide health insurance to their workers. Why is the health insurance result the only one you feel obligated to diss?

Whatever happens in the legislature and conference committee to the House approved payroll assessment (approved by a comfortable veto proof margin), let’s agree right now on one clear fact — the public agrees with it and supports it.

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The Ultimate Massachusetts Health Care Insider Information
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