Confessions of a Drug Rep (II): Data Mining in Action

Another clip from the compelling New York Times Magazine article from yesterday, Dr. Drug Rep by Dr. Daniel Carlat — click here. This involves the practice of “data mining” by pharmaceutical companies to learn the precise prescribing practices of individual physicians to target marketing efforts as precisely as possible. Here’s how it really works:

Naïve as I was, I found myself astonished at the level of detail that drug companies were able to acquire about doctors’ prescribing habits. I asked my reps about it; they told me that they received printouts tracking local doctors’ prescriptions every week. The process is called “prescription data-mining,” in which specialized pharmacy-information companies (like IMS Health and Verispan) buy prescription data from local pharmacies, repackage it, then sell it to pharmaceutical companies. This information is then passed on to the drug reps, who use it to tailor their drug-detailing strategies. This may include deciding which physicians to aim for, as my Wyeth reps did, but it can help sales in other ways. For example, Shahram Ahari, a former drug rep for Eli Lilly (the maker of Prozac) who is now a researcher at the University of California at San Francisco’s School of Pharmacy, said in an article in The Washington Post that as a drug rep he would use this data to find out which doctors were prescribing Prozac’s competitors, like Effexor. Then he would play up specific features of Prozac that contrasted favorably with the other drug, like the ease with which patients can get off Prozac, as compared with the hard time they can have withdrawing from Effexor.

The American Medical Association is also a key player in prescription data-mining. Pharmacies typically will not release doctors’ names to the data-mining companies, but they will release their Drug Enforcement Agency numbers. The A.M.A. licenses its file of U.S. physicians, allowing the data-mining companies to match up D.E.A. numbers to specific physicians. The A.M.A. makes millions in information-leasing money.

Once drug companies have identified the doctors, they must woo them. In the April 2007 issue of the journal PLoS Medicine, Dr. Adriane Fugh-Berman of Georgetown teamed up with Ahari (the former drug rep) to describe the myriad techniques drug reps use to establish relationships with physicians, including inviting them to a speaker’s meeting. These can serve to cement a positive a relationship between the rep and the doctor. This relationship is crucial, they say, since “drug reps increase drug sales by influencing physicians, and they do so with finely titrated doses of friendship.”

HCFA’s cost control legislation would ban data mining activities by drug companies in Massachusetts. Rep. Ron Mariano from Quincy has sponsored his own legislation to ban data mining. Hard to get most people to think of this as something real and worth pursuing. Thanks to NYT magazine and Dr. Carlat for bringing this obscure topic down to earth.

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1 Response to Confessions of a Drug Rep (II): Data Mining in Action

  1. Pingback: A Healthy Blog » The Legislature Advances a Bill Prohibiting Pharma from Using our Prescription Information to Market Drugs to Doctors

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