Getting to Better Care: A new biweekly feature

Every other week or so, we will bring you what think is the latest and greatest in payment reform. Some will be local, some will be not-so-local, but all will be important and fresh. So here is the first installment:

  • Karen Davis from the Commonwealth Fund shows us the Promises and Pitfalls of Global Payments. A good explanation of where we don’t want to go (capitation) and where we could go (integrated care).
  • The Administration hosted a stakeholder meeting on National Health Reform and highlighted the payment reform opportunities in that bill. We covered it on our blog.
  • The QCC Committee on the Status of Payment Reform met a few days ago. The first topic tackled was ACOs. Online, the Committee posted a number of recommended reading materials, a collection of academic articles, and a paper from the Mass Hospital Association.
  • DMH released a white paper on Shared-Decision Making in mental health. While some think this may be impossible, this paper lays out the opportunity to provide critical patient engagement to those with mental health conditions.
  • Political leaders are making sure the public knows that payment reform is a top priority for the next session. Today’s Globe reported that “Governor Deval Patrick’s administration is reviving the state’s ambitious plan to change how doctors and hospitals are paid, aiming to hand the Legislature a specific proposal by Jan. 1 and end months of disagreement.” Over at WBUR’s CommonHealth Blog, Senate President Therese Murray says payment reform continues to be a top Senate goal: “I would like to see the entire legislature and the administration pass something within the next calendar year, but we’ll keep working at it until we get something done.” Watch the full 1:12 interview below:
  • That’s all for this installment- we’ll see you in a couple of weeks!
    -The Campaign for Better Care: hcfama.org/bettercare

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